Get Involved! Freelance & Digital Communities

Nominations are open for officer positions on the SPJ Digital and SPJ Freelance communities for 2015. This is an exciting opportunity if you are interested in help setting the vision for these two important communities!

You must be a member of SPJ and the community in question to nominate yourself.
To join SPJ, visit this web site: http://www.spj.org/join.asp

For nominations for the Freelance community, visit this web site: https://www.spj.org/communities-freelance-nominate.asp
To join the Freelance community, visit this web site: https://www.spj.org/comfreelance-apply.asp

For nominations for the Digital community, visit this web site: https://www.spj.org/communities-spjdigital-nominate.asp
To join the Digital community, visit this web site: https://www.spj.org/community-join.asp?c=spjdigital

Please note – you must be logged in to your SPJ account to join either community.

Any questions? Contact Alex Veeneman, SPJ’s community coordinator, via email, at alex.veeneman01 AT gmail DOT com.

Nominations open for SPJ’s national awards

Sigma Delta Chi Awards: The Sigma Delta Chi Awards are among the premiere prizes in the profession and recognize achievement in all forms of journalism. Entries due Feb. 6, 2015.

Mark of Excellence Awards: The Mark of Excellence Awards honors the best in collegiate journalism. The annual competition offers categories in newspapers, magazines, photography, radio, television and online journalism. Entries due Jan. 23, 2015.

New America Award: SPJ’s New America Award honors public service journalism that explores and exposes an issue of importance to immigrant or ethnic communities in the United States. Entries due Feb. 13, 2015.

National High School Essay Contest: SPJ wants to increase high school students’ knowledge and understanding of the importance of independent media to our lives. The top three national winners receive scholarship awards. Postmark deadline: Feb. 28, 2015.

Want to learn more about SPJ’s awards? See a complete list here.

Minnesota SPJ’s Page One Awards call for entries will be posted soon! Get your best work from 2014 ready to enter.

 

What Can We Learn from Pointergate?

The Minnesota Pro Chapter’s board — along with the Twin Cities chapters of the National Association of Black Journalists and the Asian American Journalists Association — recently released a statement expressing concern over KSTP’s “Pointergate” story.

Read the full statement.

Read Hubbard Broadcasting CEO Stanley Hubbard’s response.

We don’t just want to do a statement, though, because we realize that there are many complex issues involved.

Minnesota SPJ, in collaboration with AAJA, TCBJ, the Silha Center for the Study of Media Ethics and Law and the Minnesota Journalism Center, will host a public forum on the ethical issues raised by this story at Cowles Auditorium on the West Bank campus of the University of Minnesota — on Dec. 8, 2014 at 7 p.m. Panelists, who will include journalism professors and media professionals, will discuss how to avoid airing a similar story in the future, as well as other questions this story presents about our community. The public is encouraged to attend.

Panelists include:

  • Jane Kirtley, University of Minnesota professor and director of the Silha Center for the Study of Media Ethics and Law.
  • Duchesne Drew, managing editor of the Star Tribune
  • Anthony Newby, executive director at MN Neighborhoods Organizing for Change

When: Dec. 8, 2014 at 7 p.m.

Where: Cowles Auditorium on the West Bank campus of the University of Minnesota

Can’t make it? The Uptake plans to stream the event at http://theuptake.org/pointergate

Stanley Hubbard Responds to Our “Pointergate” Statement

Stanley Hubbard Pointergate Response

The Society of Professional Journalists – Minnesota Pro Chapter, along with the Twin Cities chapters of the National Association of Black Journalists and the Asian American Journalists Association, as well as the Silha Center for the Study of Media Ethics and Law and the Minnesota Journalism Center, will host a panel discussion on the recent Pointergate issue in our local community. The event will take place at Cowles Auditorium on the West Bank campus of the University of Minnesota — on Dec. 8, 2014 at 7 p.m.

Read the original statement from MN SPJ, and the Twin Cities chapters of the National Association of Black Journalists and the Asian American Journalists Association, expressing concern over KSTP’s Pointergate story.

SPJ Calls on KSTP to Disavow “Pointergate” Story

Event planned to bring the community together to discuss the story.

The Minnesota Pro Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists is deeply concerned about the story that aired on KSTP-TV on Nov. 7, 2014 alleging that Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges appeared recently in a photo flashing a gang sign.

The Twin Cities chapters of the National Association of Black Journalists and the Asian American Journalists Association join MNSPJ in expressing their concern and calling for KSTP to disavow the story.

The story was fundamentally flawed and based on a faulty premise — that a silly gesture made by the mayor in a candid photo amounted to a gang sign. The SPJ code of ethics urges all journalists to never deliberately distort facts or context, including visual information. This story did just that.

Although KSTP is able to attribute the accusations to identified police sources, in airing the story KSTP failed to exercise its journalistic duty to ensure that the stories it airs are worth telling. Instead, KSTP allowed itself to be used by one political group to make points against its political opponent.

We have watched the reaction to this story with deep concern, but with appreciation for the challenges journalists face. We had hoped KSTP would realize this story never should have aired and take steps to acknowledge its mistake. But more than a week later, we feel compelled to speak out. KSTP needs to apologize to Mayor Betsy Hodges, the other person in the referenced photo, and to the public that relies on accurate, relevant information about public officials.

We do not suggest that reporter Jay Kolls or KSTP are driven by an agenda in reporting this story. In fact, both have made invaluable contributions to the local journalism community through years of solid reporting and good journalism. But this story missed obvious clues about the motivations of the sources proffering the information and cannot be defended. In addition, Kolls’ characterization of the other man in the photo merely as “a convicted felon” creates the appearance that the reporter is a mouthpiece for members of the police force who have an axe to grind with the mayor’s office.

Kolls and his editors should have applied much more skepticism to the elements of this story as it was presented to him. Again, the SPJ Code of Ethics says, as journalists, we should acknowledge mistakes and correct them promptly and prominently. This story was deeply flawed, and KSTP and Kolls need to acknowledge that.

MNSPJ, in collaboration with AAJA, TCBJ, the Silha Center for the Study of Media Ethics and Law and the Minnesota Journalism Center, will host a public forum on the ethical issues raised by this story at Cowles Auditorium on the West Bank campus of the University of Minnesota — on Dec. 8, 2014 at 7 p.m. Panelists, who will include journalism professors and media professionals, will discuss how to avoid airing a similar story in the future, as well as other questions this story presents about our community. Members of the local law enforcement community, Mayor Hodges and representatives of KSTP will also be invited to participate. The public is encouraged to attend.

For more information, please contact:

Jonathan Kealing, Minnesota SPJ president-elect
jkealing@gmail.com

Chris Newmarker, Minnesota SPJ president
cnewmarker@gmail.com

 

You’re Invited!

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