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Annual Meeting Thursday in St. Paul

The annual meeting for the Minnesota chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists (MNSPJ) is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, July 18, at Dual Citizen Brewing, 725 Raymond Ave., St. Paul. (https://dualcitizenbrewing.com/)

We’ll certify results from the election of board members and socialize. Please join us!

Meet candidates for MNSPJ board and officers

Ballots will be mailed out tonight to members in good standing. You’ll have 30 days to vote. The board will certify the election at its annual meeting sometime after July 18. There are four open director seats with two-year terms and one open director seat with a one year term. Officer positions (president-elect, secretary and treasurer) are one year terms. 

 

Emma Nelson for president elect

Emma Nelson is the lead St. Paul City Hall reporter at the Minneapolis Star Tribune. She previously covered Minneapolis City Hall and the exurban south metro and worked on reporting teams that covered the aftermath of the Norwood Teague sexual harassment scandal and the death of Prince. She is a graduate of the University of Minnesota and a St. Paul native.

Candidate statement

My name is Emma Nelson, and I am running for president-elect of the Minnesota Pro chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists.

When I graduated from the University of Minnesota with a journalism degree, the doomsday predictions for our industry were all about money. How would publications stay afloat in the digital age? How could we convince people – especially young people – that news is worth paying for? Was journalism over?

I strongly believe that the past few years have proven good journalism is very much alive, even as the ways we create and consume it change. The challenge now is one many of us never predicted: the growing lack of trust from the communities we serve, and the fight to prove that the stories we report are fair and true.

During the past year, the SPJ board has tackled this head-on with a series of powerful and informative events designed to educate the public about our work and the state of the media today. I want to build on that effort over the next two years.

Minnesotans need to know who their local journalists are, and SPJ is in an ideal position to connect reporters with people across the state. As president-elect and then as president, I want to work with the board to organize events in the Twin Cities – and possibly outside the metro, depending on our resources – where community members can meet journalists and learn about what they do. I’m envisioning panels organized around specific coverage areas – similar to the food critics event this spring – with reporters from different publications coming together to talk about their jobs, whether they cover sports, crime or city hall.

At the same time, I want to continue to put on the kinds of community and industry events that we have in the past, from panels and happy hours to a revamped version of Page One Awards banquet. Bringing journalists together to share successes and worries and ideas for the future is just as important as connecting with the public.

More than anything, I see this role as an opportunity to support Minnesota journalists, including SPJ board members. I’m excited about the ideas that the board has already brought to fruition and am looking forward to seeing what’s next. In my time as a board member, I have found SPJ to be a truly welcoming and supportive community. My goal is to make sure that continues.

Fred Melo for board secretary

Fred Melo has been a reporter with the St. Paul Pioneer Press since January 2005 and currently covers St. Paul City Hall and all things St. Paul that are not crime-related. He resides in a St. Paul home with his St. Paul-reared wife and their two small St. Paul children.

Candidate statement
It’s truly been an honor to serve on the board of MNSPJ these past three years, including spending the last two years as a board officer (Secretary). I’m asking for your vote to re-elect me to that position. I will continue to maintain the minutes at meetings, write regular newsletters and occasionally update Twitter and live-Tweet events.

The board has repeatedly called for freedom of the press in the courtroom, on social media and in local government, and I’ve been proud to have a hand in that.

Just as importantly, I’ve aimed to connect younger folks to MNSPJ, to jobs, to scholarships, and to the good work that journalists do.

Through a contract I negotiated with ThreeSixty Journalism and the St. Paul Neighborhood Network, we had a high school student interview three working journalists for a video series that will air on the web shortly.

I co-chaired our scholarship committee, which awarded $3,500 in funds to college students this year. I also oversaw Intern Night at WCCO, which draws employers for a panel discussion with students each October.

My goals for 2019-2020 include organizing another fall mixer for board officers from media associations such as the Asian American Journalists Association and the National Association of Black Journalists. We all do better when we all do better!

Briana Bierschbach for treasurer

Briana Bierschbach is a political reporter with nearly a decade of experience covering the Minnesota Capitol. Prior to joining the Minnesota Public Radio Capitol bureau last year, she covered the Capitol for MinnPost, Politics in Minnesota and the Associated Press.

Candidate statement

It’s my first year on the MNSPJ Board and I’ve been blown away by all the things the group takes on. Recently becoming the board’s treasurer, I have a new appreciation for the investment MNSPJ puts into informative community events, awards ceremonies and legal battles for First Amendment protections.

I’m asking for your vote to re-elect me treasurer of MNSPJ. In that role, I will continue to help manage the board’s accounts and file quarterly and annual reports. I will also help the board find new ways to pay for things that are core to its mission: celebrating quality local journalism, protecting the rights of journalists and promoting best practices with other journalists and the broader community.

Hal Davis for director

I’ve worked in wire and print+digital newsrooms in New York City; Dayton, Ohio; and St. Paul.

Candidate statement

I’ve seen news organizations thrive with impressive talent. At the 2019 MNSPJ Page One Awards, we saw what that talent can do. I want to help SPJ help that talent thrive.

One way is to promote open access to information.

During my first term on the board, I submitted a request to the national SPJ Legal Defense Fund for a grant to fund a court challenge to view public information from files emanating from the Jacob Wetterling abduction case. SPJ supported the disclosure of the investigative files, and granted $10,000 to share with the Minnesota Coalition on Government Information.

MNCOGI brought the motion to intervene in the case; I also serve on its board. Judge Ann Carrott ruled that all the state documents in the investigative file must be released to the public.

SPJ also took part in the successful effort to make sure the media and public had access to all videos and photos in the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Mohamed Noor. Judge Kathryn Quaintance ruled media would have access to body cam video and other evidence.

We also discuss issues important to journalists.

Two defamation cases before the Minnesota Supreme Court may affect how journalists here can report what police say after they arrest someone, and how anyone not a journalist may be prevented from reporting what happened to her. But does this mean the court gets to define who’s a journalist? I plan to bring media lawyers together to let us know the state of the law as we do our jobs.

I hope to expand this with more media-law discussions.

It’s been a great first term. I’ve learned how much I’ve yet to learn about Minnesota journalism. I hope to continue.

Nicole Norfleet for director

Nicole Norfleet is a business reporter at the Star Tribune covering commercial real estate and professional services. She has been at the Star Tribune for about 10 years after graduating from the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. Besides her involvement with SPJ, she is also president of Twin Cities Black Journalists.

Candidate statement

I would like to serve as an SPJ board member for the second time. I think with my involvement leading Twin Cities Black Journalists that I bring another important voice to the group. I’m passionate about media literacy and newsroom diversity, and I hope to help SPJ prioritize both in the coming years.

Jackie Renzetti for director

Having filled in for Youssef Rddad on the MNSPJ board since February, I’d be honored to have your vote to continue serving for another two-year term.

While studying journalism and political science at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, I spent most of my time at the offices of Radio K, where I hosted our local music show and co-produced the station’s podcast, and the Minnesota Daily, where I held multiple leadership positions, including editor of our special projects desk.

I also interned at the Minneapolis-St. Paul Business Journal, The Current, Star Tribune and APM Reports. After graduating in May 2017, I taught media literacy for Minneapolis Community Education and the Journalistic Learning Initiative in Eugene, Oregon. I also regularly freelanced for Oregon’s second-largest daily newspaper, the Register-Guard.

In April 2018, I returned to the Twin Cities for an enterprise reporting position with RiverTown Multimedia, which is owned by Forum Communications and publishes several newspapers in the southeast St. Paul suburban area and western Wisconsin. In my first year here, I’ve written two award-winning stories on social issues and I’ve helped establish a business and development beat.

Candidate statement

Since moving back to Minnesota, I’ve been grateful for opportunities provided by MNSPJ to strengthen my reporting skills. These experiences inspired me to apply for a vacant spot on the board in early 2019. I’d embrace the opportunity to continue serving on the MNSPJ board and to contribute as much as I can, especially with our new media literacy efforts.

For instance, I’ve been tasked with boosting the national #Press4Ed initiative in Minnesota, and I’d like to explore ways we could support student newsrooms statewide. Additional top journalism concerns of mine include fostering a more diverse industry and expanding ways local journalists can engage with their communities.

I believe MNSPJ provides key resources and protection for journalists as newsrooms continue to shrink and endure difficult circumstances, including attacks on press freedom. I am deeply thankful to have learned the ropes of reporting in the Twin Cities’ vibrant journalism community, and I want to do as much as I can to preserve and strengthen it. With a passion for teamwork, I’d be honored to do so by working with the MNSPJ board. Thank you for your consideration.

2019 Page One Awards Celebrate Journalism Excellence in Minnesota

Governor Tim Walz looks out at the crowd of journalists as he speaks about the growing importance of journalism. On Tuesday, June 4, 2019, journalists from around Minnesota joined together at the Town and Country Club in St. Paul for the MNSPJ Page One Awards ceremony.

On a stormy Tuesday evening, local journalists gathered, socialized, and toasted to the hard work of their peers at the 2019 MNSPJ Page One Awards.

Star Tribune editor Dave Hage was named Journalist of the Year, and MPR News photographer Evan Frost was named Young Journalist of the Year. Star Tribune’s “Denied Justice” package received the Story of the Year award.

Minnesota Public Radio’s Angela Davis, host of MPR News with Angela Davis, presented the night’s awards. Davis also spoke about the role journalists must play in the future — both to seek out untold stories, and to bring more diversity into newsrooms. “This is not the time to be silent,” she said. “This is not the time for complacency.”

Co-host Angela Davis of Minnesota Public Radio reads off all of the award winners of the Page One award ceremony. On Tuesday, June 4, 2019, journalists from around Minnesota joined together at the Town and Country Club in St. Paul for the Minnesota Society of Professional Journalists’ Page One award ceremony.

Longtime Star Tribune journalist Lori Sturdevant received the 2019 Peter S. Popovich Award, which is given to a person or organization that exemplifies the fight for First Amendment rights. In her acceptance speech, Sturdevant urged her colleagues to “keep knocking on the closed doors,” and cited a quote from Elmer L. Andersen — Minnesota’s 30th governor and later a newspaper publisher — “You can trust the people to do the right thing—provided they get the facts.” Sturdevant recently retired from the Star Tribune and has been a reporter, editorial writer and columnist who has written about Minnesota government and politics since 1978. She is also the author or editor of 11 books about notable Minnesotans.

On Tuesday, June 4, 2019, journalists from around Minnesota joined together at the Town and Country Club in St. Paul for the MNSPJ Page One award ceremony.

The Page One Awards also honored the best pieces in Minnesota journalism published or broadcast during the 2018 calendar year. About 150 journalists working for print, TV, radio and online outlets attended the event, which was held at the Town & Country Club in St. Paul. The entries for this year’s awards were judged by members of the Kansas City Heartland of America Club.

Gov. Tim Walz, Minnesota’s 41st governor, gave the banquet’s keynote speech, and noted it was his 25th wedding anniversary that night. He spoke about the importance of news organizations for shaping the statewide conversation, his push in Congress for politicians’ financial transparency, and shared an anecdote about being interviewed by a high school journalist in 2005 during his first congressional campaign. The governor also took questions, and didn’t hold back from impassioned talk about the frustrations of the recent state budget process.

Minnesota SPJ also announced two scholarship winners. A $2,500 scholarship went to University of Minnesota student Dylan Miettinen, who is interning with CNN this summer in Atlanta, Georgia. “His clips were meaty,” said presenter and MNSPJ Secretary Frederick Melo. “Yet he never failed to find human beings to illustrate a trend, whether writing about legislative bills to ban gay Conversion Therapy, interviewing students for a story about a new study on poor health outcomes for non-binary students; interviewing college students living with diabetes, and patients undergoing their own at-home cancer treatments.” U of M student Becca Most received a $1,000 scholarship.

Minnesota SPJ President Joe Spear awarded the President’s Award to Christopher Snowbeck, the incoming president. Snowbeck was credited for his efforts to revamp the Page One Awards categories, his common sense, and spreadsheets that “are works of art.”

The Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ), the oldest and largest organization of journalists in the U.S., was founded as Sigma Delta Chi in 1909.  The Minnesota Chapter, which has about 100 members, was founded in 1956.

If you would like to order duplicate awards or have any awards-related questions, please contact Minnesota SPJ at minnesota.spj@gmail.com.

The complete list of winners can be viewed here.

On Tuesday, June 4, 2019, journalists from around Minnesota joined together at the Town and Country Club in St. Paul for the Minnesota Society of Professional Journalists’ Page One award ceremony. Laura Yuen, of MPR News, chats with her colleagues before the reception.

Governor Tim Walz speaks to a crowd of journalists about raising the bar to achieve ‘one Minnesota’. On Tuesday, June 4, 2019, journalists from around Minnesota joined together at the Town and Country Club in St. Paul for the Minnesota Society of Professional Journalists’ Page One award ceremony.

On Tuesday, June 4, 2019, journalists from around Minnesota joined together at the Town and Country Club in St. Paul for the Minnesota Society of Professional Journalists’ Page One award ceremony. The Association of Minnesota Public Educational Radio Stations was one of many of the news outlets that was in attendance.

And the 2019 Page One Awards Go To…

Thanks to all journalists who joined MNSPJ for the annual Page One Awards banquet on Tuesday evening. All winners have now been posted to the website — use these links to navigate categories. Congratulations!

Special Awards:

2019 Page One Awards – Special Award Winners

Newspapers:

2019 Page One Awards in Newspaper Journalism

Magazines:

2019 Page One Awards in Magazine Journalism

Television:

2019 Page One Awards in Television Journalism

Radio:

2019 Page One Awards in Radio Journalism

Online:

2019 Page One Awards in Online Journalism

Photography:

2019 Page One Awards in Photography

 

2019 Page One Awards in Newspaper Journalism

MNSPJ congratulates all the winners recognized Tuesday night at the annual Page One Awards!  Here’s a list of winners for excellence in newspaper journalism.

BREAKING NEWS

Less than 50,000 circulation:

First place

“’It felt like a bomb’ — Explosions, fire rock Superior oil refinery.”

John Myers, Jana Hollingsworth and Jimmy Lovrien, Duluth News Tribune

The judge said the story “had incredible quotes, plenty of sources and terrific detail.”

 

Second place

“Grim discovery on quiet street.”

Andrew Haffner, Grand Forks Herald

 

50,000+ circulation:

First place

Coverage of the Jacob Wetterling case

Rochelle Olson and Jim Walsh, Star Tribune

The judge described it as “a huge amount of material that was put together to make a most fascinating story,” adding, “as soon as I started reading it, I knew it was the first place winner.”

 

Second place

Coverage of the charges against former Minneapolis police officer Mohamed Noor

Libor Jany, David Chanen, Brandon Stahl and Faiza Mahamud, Star Tribune

 

DEADLINE NEWS COVERAGE

Less than 50,000 circulation:

First place

“UND, donor at odds over logo.”

Tom Miller, Grand Forks Herald

The judge said: “I love it when reporters use open records laws to dig up facts that might not have otherwise become public, which Miller did here. He put a lot of work into this.”

 

Second place

“A call for action.”

Dylan Thomas, Southwest Journal

 

Third place

“A ‘hostile’ relationship.”

Andrew Haffner, Grand Forks Herald

 

50,000+ circulation

First place

Coverage of the 2018 Super Bowl

Star Tribune staff

The judge called it “Well-written” and “comprehensive,” “from the beginning to the end.”

 

Second Place

Coverage of the 2018 Election

Star Tribune staff

 

Third place

Coverage of the Minnesota Vikings

Chris Tomasson, St. Paul Pioneer Press

 

FEATURE

Less than 50,000 circulation:

First Place

“The cost of a home.”

Michelle Bruch, Southwest Journal

The judge said: “This piece does an excellent job of connecting faces and personal stories to an issue that would otherwise be all about impersonal statistics.”

 

Second Place

‘Not just a sandwich’ — Duluth’s beloved ‘micro-smokery’ celebrates 20 years”

Jana Hollingsworth, Duluth News Tribune

 

Third Place

“Life after lotto.”

Brad Dokken, Grand Forks Herald

 

50,000+ circulation:

First Place

Selection of feature stories

Rachel Hutton, Star Tribune

The judge said: “These entries do a great job of translating big personalities onto the page.”

 

Second Place

“50 years ago, St. Paul police tear gassed a barricaded dance hall. So began the Stem Hall race riots.”

Nick Woltman, St. Paul Pioneer Press

 

Third Place

“The #MeToo movement in Minnesota’s immigrant communities.”

Mila Koumpilova, Star Tribune

 

Enterprise/In-Depth (Single story)

Less than 50,000 circulation:

First place

“Silent Killer: Family loses loved ones to poisoning.”

Brian Arola, Mankato Free Press

The judge called it “well-written,” and “a touching article about a family’s loss and grief due to a silent killer that could have been prevented.”

 

Second Place

“Parents’ rights unsolved.”

Janelle Vonasek, Grand Forks Herald

 

Third Place

“Mom speaks out after autistic son sent to jail.”

Trey Mewes, Mankato Free Press

 

50,000+ circulation:

First Place

“The Wall of Forgotten Natives: Inside Minneapolis’ largest homeless encampment.”

Susan Du, City Pages

The judge said: “The reporter did a good job reminding everyone that homeless people are important members of society, they once had jobs and homes but due to hard times or crisis they have hit rock bottom.”

 

Second Place

“Fatal plunge into Lake Minnetonka tests a father and a marriage.”

Mary Lynn Smith, Star Tribune

 

Third Place

“Adoption numbers plummet in Minnesota and nationwide.”

Shannon Prather, Star Tribune

 

Enterprise/In-Depth (Series)

Less than 50,000 circulation:

First Place

“The risk remains.”

Brooks Johnson, Duluth News Tribune

The judge called it a “well-written article that sheds light on potentially dangerous chemicals that are in our communities that we are not aware of, or don’t think about until disaster happens.”

 

Second Place

“Sustainable.”

Frank Jossi, Finance & Commerce

 

Third Place

“UND budget cuts.”

Andrew Haffner, Grand Forks Herald

 

50,000+ circulation:

First Place

“Aging parents, stressed families.”

Jackie Crosby, Star Tribune

The judge said: “This reporter touches on the lives of families that are struggling to deal with the medical diagnoses of Alzheimer’s and dementia, and the walls they face as they decide how to care for their aging parent … Good job exploring a subject that needs to be brought to the forefront.”

 

Second Place

“A Test of Faith: The Un-churching of America.”

Jean Hopfensperger, Star Tribune

 

Third Place

“Minnesota Historical Society broadens how it tells the state’s history.”

Shannon Prather, Star Tribune

 

Investigative

Less than 50,000 circulation:

First Place

“Dentistry in decay: Twin Ports dentists struggle to see area’s poorest children.”

Brady Slater, Duluth News Tribune

The judge called it “a well-sourced story that details both the local and broader scope of the problem, looks at a current model of care and lays out potential solutions.”

 

Second place

“Sex buyer ‘john’ has a name.”

Sara Marie Moore, Shoreview Press

 

Third place

“The saga of Superintendent Rod Thompson.”

Amanda McKnight and Deena Winter, Shakopee Valley News

 

50,000+ circulation:

First Place

“Denied Justice.”

Brandon Stahl, Jennifer Bjorhus, Renee Jones Schneider and MaryJo Webster, Star Tribune

The judge said the story “is very well written and draws the reader into the story right away … Readers should be angry that this is happening and work with these women to seek justice not only for them, but for others as well. Good job.”

 

Second Place

“The Unknowable Truth: Jurors think Mariel Grimm nearly killed a baby. How she did it, no-one could say.”

Susan Du, City Pages

 

Third place

“Lake Elmo didn’t make 3M pay.”

Bob Shaw, St. Paul Pioneer Press

 

Business news coverage

Less than 50,000 circulation:

First Place

“Firm footing for now.”

Andrew Haffner, Grand Forks Herald

The judge described it as “Great coverage” with and “enticing layout” and “graphics [that] really grab your attention. Top notch.”

 

Second Place

“Surly tip-pooling settlement has a ripple effect.”

Michelle Bruch, Southwest Journal

 

Third Place

Selection of stories

William Morris, Finance & Commerce

 

50,000+ circulation

First Place

“Legal War Engulfs 3M Device.”

Joe Carlson, Star Tribune

The judge called it “An entry to be proud of, and a joy to read.”

 

Second Place

“Raise Your Hamm’s: As Minnesota craft beer booms, the humble ‘Beer Refreshing’ is having a resurgence of its own.”

Em Cassel, City Pages

 

Third Place

“Hey St. Paul: Here’s some TIF Advice.”

Frederick Melo, St. Paul Pioneer Press

 

Sports News Coverage

Less than 50,000 circulation:

First place

“Maverick Hockey Section.”

Shane Frederick, Pat Christman and Jackson Forderer, Mankato Free Press

The judge called it “A solid preview section. It’s packed full of information and offers a little bit of everything for fans of MSU hockey. Well done.”

 

Second place

“NCHC ref Dan Dreger takes puck to face.”

Brad Schlossman, Grand Forks Herald

 

Third place

“A year after cutting sports, UND athletics adjusts.”

Tom Miller, Grand Forks Herald

 

50,000+ circulation:

First Place

Coverage of the Minnesota Vikings

Ben Goessling, Star Tribune

The judge said: “Ben’s writing style is smooth and entertaining. The story about Diggs’ playoff-winning touchdown provided a jolt while reading it, despite it being well more than a year later.”

 

Second place

Coverage of the Minnesota Wild

Sarah McClellan, Star Tribune

 

Third place

Coverage of the Minnesota Gophers

Marcus Fuller, Star Tribune

 

Sports Feature Story

Less than 50,000 circulation:

First place

“The draw of history.”

Melinda Lavine, Duluth News Tribune

The judge said: “You follow the No. 1 rule of feature writing: You show rather than tell. Great job on getting me hooked on a topic I don’t normally read.”

 

Second place

“YouTube punter.”

Tom Miller, Grand Forks Herald

 

Third place

“All aboard.”

Brad Schlossman, Grand Forks Herald

 

50,000+ circulation:

First place

Ben Goessling, Star Tribune.

The judge said: “Ben has a knack for telling behind-the-scenes stories that pique the interest of even non-Vikings fans. That peel-back-the-curtain style is exactly what feature writing should be.”

 

Second Place

Rachel Blount, Star Tribune

 

Third place

Dennis Anderson, Star Tribune.

 

Sports column [NOTE: no distinction in this category based on circulation]

First place

Chip Scoggins, Star Tribune.

The judge said: “Good style with a mix of opinion and strong storytelling. Great job.”

 

Second place

Shane Frederick, Mankato Free Press.

 

Third place

Brad Schlossman, Grand Forks Herald.

 

Arts & Entertainment Coverage

Less than 50,000 circulation:

First place

Selected Arts & Entertainment coverage

Christa Lawler, Duluth News Tribune

The judge said: “Each of these stories really brings the emotions of the subjects to the forefront, and that makes for compelling tales.”

 

Second Place

“The art of entertaining: Burlesque dancers make strides toward acceptance.”

Melinda Lavine, Duluth News Tribune

 

Third Place

“When arena rock tribute band Hairball plays Prince at the Minnesota State Fair.”

Jackie Renzetti, Hastings Star Gazette/Rivertown Multimedia

 

50,000+ circulation:

First place

Jon Bream, Star Tribune

The judge complemented Bream’s writing in particular, saying, “Like Springsteen, you are a great storyteller.”

 

Second Place

Jeff Baenen, Amy Forliti, and Doug Glass, Associated Press.

 

Third Place

Jenna Ross, Star Tribune

 

Arts Criticism/Reviews

Less than 50,000 circulation:

First place

“Exhibition as experience.”

Dylan Thomas, Southwest Journal

The judge said: “The author obviously knows much about the arts, but also a lot about how the arts are presented in exhibition. Armed with this expertise, the reviewer deftly places the exhibition in context … a strong effort.”

 

Second place

“On Movies: Crazy Rich Asians.”

Yun Ji Nam, Red and Green

 

50,000+ circulation:

First Place

A selection of theater reviews

Pamela Espeland, MinnPost

The judge complimented Espeland’s “crisp writing” and thoughtful approach.

 

Second Place

A selection of restaurant reviews

Hannah Sayle, City Pages

 

Third Place

Selected reviews

Laurie Hertzel, Star Tribune

 

Column

Less than 50,000 circulation:

First Place

A selection of columns

Robb Murray, Mankato Free Press

The judge said: “Mr. Murray’s columns displayed not only meaning and emotion but personal courage … These were three fine pieces of writing that I truly enjoyed.”

 

Second Place

“My Minneapolis.”

Jim Walsh, Southwest Journal

 

Third Place

“Maybe the Reddi-Bacon will return.”

Tim Krohn, Mankato Free Press

 

50,000+ circulation:

First place

A selection of metro columns

Jennifer Brooks, Star Tribune

The judge said: “All three columns discuss topics that are timely and relatable, not only for local readers, but on a national level.”

 

Second Place

“Frederick Melo: You don’t know TIF!”

Frederick Melo, St. Paul Pioneer Press

 

Third Place

A selection of metro columns

Ruben Rosario, St. Paul Pioneer Press

 

Editorial

Less than 50,000 circulation (all winners submitted a selection of editorials):

First place

Brian Hunhoff, Yankton County Observer

The judge said: “It’s not often that an editorial can be considered a “joy to read,” but Brian Hunhoff pulled it off three times with his entries. All are well-written, engaging and take definitive stands on issues of consequence.”

 

Second place

Joe Spear, Mankato Free Press

 

Third Place

Mike Jacobs, Grand Forks Herald

 

50,000+ circulation:

First place

“Lives at stake, voices raised.”

Star Tribune Editorial Board

The judge said: “The editorial board is to be commended for its clear, concise arguments that are supported well and draw logical conclusions. All of the submissions addressed important community topics, and the board’s stands provided thought leadership on those issues.”

 

Second Place

A selection of columns

Lori Sturdevant, Star Tribune

 

Third place

“The new war on birthright citizenship.”

Star Tribune Editorial Board

 

Graphics/Art and Illustration

Less than 50,000 circulation:

First Place

“Ranking risk.”

Carli Greninger, Grand Forks Herald

The judge said: “The primary art for this graphic actually made me say, “Wow,” out loud … Great work.”

 

Second place

“Is ignorance bliss?”

Isis Cabral, Red and Green

 

50,000+ circulation:

First Place

“Warm, but not too warm.”

Ray Grumney, Star Tribune

The judge said: “Using nothing but data as a visual illustrator for a story is incredibly difficult, but you’ve done it masterfully here … Absolutely stunning.”

 

Second Place

“No big deal.”

Ben Ramsden, Mark Reilly and Patrick Rehkamp, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal

 

Third Place

“Holiday book guide.”

Mike Rice, Star Tribune

 

Page Design

Less than 50,000 circulation:

First Place

“Gold rush/Hockey town hero.”

Kirsten Stromsodt and Meaghan MacDonald, Grand Forks Herald

The judge said this submission’s “striking layout stops the eye cold – in all the right ways.”

 

Second place

“The year that was with Lizz Winstead.”

Brenda Taylor, Southwest Journal

 

Third Place

“The fig is up.”

Micah Edel, Southwest Journal

 

50,000 circulation:

First Place

“Portraits of Prince’s Hometown Love Affair.”

Mike Rice and Tom Wallace, Star Tribune

The judge called this submission an “excellent marriage of headline, story and photo … Good thinking and execution went into this page design.”

 

Second place

“Super Bowl bet.”

Ben Ramsden, Mark Reilly and Dirk DeYoung, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal

 

Third Place

“Gold rush.”

Josh Jones, Star Tribune

 

Headlines

Less than 50,000 circulation:

First Place

“Flushing truth down an Oval hole”; “An angel walked among us” and “Ghosts of aging dream still haunt Devil’s Nest.”

Brian Hunhoff, Yankton County Observer

The judge said: “These headlines accurately and concisely highlight each article’s most intriguing angles.”

 

Second Place

“A touch of classic Yankton”; “Love the Mall you have” and “The bird man of downtown Yankton.”

Kathy Church and Brian Hunhoff, Yankton County Observer

 

50,000+ circulation:

First place

“These kids hope to be arrow-dynamic”; “For some, skiing is believing” and “Cue snow globe, it’s Super Sunday.”

Mark Wolleman, Star Tribune

The judge said: “Your headlines are on the right side of the line between being clever and corny. Good job.”

 

Best Issue

Less than 50,000 circulation:

First Place

Mankato Free Press

The judge said: “The Free Press has a good balance of sharing the national and local news. One of their features in this issue on Somali language classes for Mankatoans points out the importance of diversity in the local as well as national arenas. A delightful plus for the paper is their inclusion of fiction as part of their Sunday edition.”

 

Second Place

Grand Forks Herald

 

50,000+ circulation:

First place

Star Tribune

The judge said: “This newspaper won hands down with the reporting, writing, photography, graphics and layout … I’d look forward to a Sunday read with this newspaper.”

 

2019 Page One Awards in Magazine Journalism

MNSPJ congratulates all the winners recognized Tuesday night at the annual Page One Awards!  Here’s a list of winners for excellence in magazine journalism.

MAGAZINES

Best Profile Story

First Place

“The 100-foot fall.”

Renee Berg, Rochester Magazine

The judge said: “The writing here keeps you engaged in Amber’s story and invested in the outcome, while also revealing her personality along the way.”

 

Second place

“Born to run.”

James Walsh, Star Tribune

 

Third Place

“The ramen architect.”

James Norton, The Growler

 

Best Feature Story

First Place

“Beyond the talk.”

Jennifer Hyvonen, Minnesota Parent

The judge called it “a personal and educational piece told in a very warm, humorous and informative manner.”

 

Second Place

“The IUD is back and better.”

Kate Dohman, Minnesota Parent

 

Third Place

“Sixty years of Omm Pah Pah.”

Robb Murray, Mankato Free Press

 

Best Department

First Place

“Random Rochesterite.”

Jennifer Koski, Rochester Magazine

The judge complemented this entry’s “great layout, overall great look and feel to the sections.”

 

Second place

“State secrets.”

Eric Roper, Star Tribune

 

Third Place

“Ten Questions.”

Steve Lange, Rochester Magazine

 

Best Column

First place

“Oddchester.”

Steve Lange, Rochester Magazine

The judge said: “Highly relatable subject matter, combined with an enjoyable voice and style, reminds us that a sense of community is still an important part of our lives. We need steady, dependable columnists more than ever.”

 

Second place

“Afraid to ask.”

Gail Rosenblum, Star Tribune

 

Third place

“World’s okay-est mom.”

Katie Dohman, Minnesota Parent

 

Best Cover

First Place

Micah Edel, Minnesota Good Age’s July 2018 issue.

The judge said: “GREAT use of color for coordinating with the photo used. Overall, clean design and feel, while bringing out design from the photo into the design of the text and lines.”

 

Second Place

Casie Beldo, Ari Woeste and Erica Loeks, Minnesota Monthly’s December 2018 issue.

 

Third Place

“Fall arts.”

Emily Utne, City Pages

 

Best Page Design

First Place

“The Wild Side.”

Micah Edel, Minnesota Good Age

The judge called this entry “cohesive and pleasing to look at. Impressive work.”

 

Second place

“Diagnosis: Gifted.”

Valerie Moe, Minnesota Parent

 

Third Place

“X-Games: Your favorite extreme sports throw-down is back in Minneapolis.”

Emily Utne, City Pages

 

Graphics/Art and illustration

First place

“Fringe 2018.”

Sango Bang and Emily Utne, City Pages

The judge complimented this entry’s use of color and level of detail.

 

Second place

“Born to run.”

Tim O’Brien and Kim Vu, Star Tribune

 

Best Issue

First Place

Mankato Magazine, December 2018 issue

The judge called this submission “a stand-out in its category. Not only did the main story grab interest, but the variety of articles was outstanding and all of the articles had meat to them. The layout was eye pleasing and the balance of content to advertisements was spot on.”

 

Second place

“Born to run.”

Star Tribune